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UMRR News & Events

Mississippi River Environmental Management Program Pool 9
LANSING, Iowa-- The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Paul District, and many federal, state and local partners, are working together to restore habitat along the Mississippi River.
Published: 10/16/2013
Bassmaster Elite Series comes to Upper Mississippi River
The 2013 Bassmaster Elite Series: Mississippi River Rumble is June 20-23 in La Crosse, Wis. This is the eighth year of the world’s premier competitive bass fishing circuit for top anglers.
Published: 6/12/2013

 

 UMRR-EMP LTRMP Data, Tools, & Resources

 

Congress authorized the Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program in the 1986 Water Resources Development Act to help address ecological needs on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS). Subsequent amendments have helped shape the two major elements  of UMRR- the Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Projects (HREPs) and the Long Term Resource Monitoring (LTRM). Together, HREPs and LTRM are designed to improve the environmental health of the UMRS and increase our understanding of its natural resources.  The UMRR Program was formerly known as the Environmental Management Program (EMP).

 

The Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program is a federal-state partnership designed to restore, protect, 
and monitor the natural resources of the Upper Mississippi River System.
Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program: Restoring and Monitoring
The Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) Program is a federal-state partnership designed to restore, protect, and monitor the natural resources of the Upper Mississippi River System.
This project involved two huge gated-culverts and a channel hundreds of feet long to provide dissolved oxygen in the backwater. Seven acres were also dredged to create deeper wintertime fish habitat.
Island 42 Habitat Restoration & Enhancement Program
This project involved two huge gated-culverts and a channel hundreds of feet long to provide dissolved oxygen in the backwater. Seven acres were also dredged to create deeper wintertime fish habitat.
This is a 500-acre backwater complex, consisting of two miles of island, a berm to reduce sediment, and a small channel. The island protects the area from waves and current, thereby improving light penetration in the water and allowing plants to grow for the benefit of fish and wildlife. Dredging provided wintertime fish habitat.
Mud Lake Habitat Restoration & Enhancement Program
This is a 500-acre backwater complex, consisting of two miles of island, a berm to reduce sediment, and a small channel. The island protects the area from waves and current, thereby improving light penetration in the water and allowing plants to grow for the benefit of fish and wildlife. Dredging provided wintertime fish habitat.
This 600-acre land and water project provides a 10,200-foot-long rock dike around the head of the island, which deflects sediment from the aquatic and wetlands complex behind it.
Pharrs Island Habitat Restoration & Enhancement Program
This 600-acre land and water project provides a 10,200-foot-long rock dike around the head of the island, which deflects sediment from the aquatic and wetlands complex behind it.
The project included constructing islands and dredging to increase water depths. It improved conditions for more than 45 fish species. The island protects the area from waves and current which increases light penetration in the water, allowing plants to grow for the benefit of fish and wildlife. The project also improved wintertime habitat for fish.
Pool 8 Islands Habitat Restoration & Enhancement Program
The project included constructing islands and dredging to increase water depths. It improved conditions for more than 45 fish species. The island protects the area from waves and current which increases light penetration in the water, allowing plants to grow for the benefit of fish and wildlife. The project also improved wintertime habitat for fish.
A riverside levee reduces sediment input into the lake. Two interior closures were installed to divide the lake into three independently managed units. Islands were constructed to protect the area from waves and current. Pumps and water control structures were installed to re-create historic water-level variations; and deep-water habitat was created for fish.
Swan Lake Habitat Restoration & Enhancement Program
A riverside levee reduces sediment input into the lake. Two interior closures were installed to divide the lake into three independently managed units. Islands were constructed to protect the area from waves and current. Pumps and water control structures were installed to re-create historic water-level variations; and deep-water habitat was created for fish.