US Army Corps of Engineers
Rock Island District Website

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Archive: September, 2012
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  • September

    District contributes to "Feds Feed Families"

    The Rock Island District participated in the 2012 "Feds Feed Families" food drive in August. The Rock Island Arsenal and Soldiers from the U.S. Army Sustainment Command distributed collection cans, picked-up the donations and in total delivered more than 3,000 pounds of food to the River Bend Foodbank in Moline, Ill.
  • Floodwall Under Construction

    A source of water for nearly 131,000 people will soon be protected from flood waters. Construction of the Davenport Flood Risk Management Project, Reach 1 was awarded to Valley Construction with work starting in November 2011. The project is anticipated to be complete by November 2013.
  • Master Plan updates underway

    (September 2012) An effort is underway to update the Corps Master Plans for Saylorville Lake and Lake Red Rock, two of the Districts flood risk management reservoirs. The current plans were completed in 1984 and 1976 respectively, serving as guides for recreational and environmental stewardship decisions. Many things have since changed including land use changes within the watershed and on project lands, adjacent community growth and development, as well as an increasing demand for recreational opportunities.
  • District contributes to "Feds Feed Families"

    The Rock Island District participated in the 2012 "Feds Feed Families" food drive in August. The Rock Island Arsenal and Soldiers from the U.S. Army Sustainment Command distributed collection cans, picked-up the donations and in total delivered more than 3,000 pounds of food to the River Bend Foodbank in Moline, Ill.
  • Why do we have locks and dams?

    The Mississippi has long been used for transportation; however, navigation has been forced to accommodate its whims; deep-flowing but turbulent in times of flooding; placid but shallow to the point of non-navigability in times of drought. Other obstacles included swift and treacherous rapids, submerged rocks and boulders and uncharted sand bars and tree snags, which ended the life of many steamers in the nineteenth century.