US Army Corps of Engineers
Rock Island District

The Upper Mississippi River Comprehensive Basin Study

Rock Island District

An executive order providing for an Upper Mississippi River Basin Commission was signed by the president on March 22, 1972. The Commission was composed of representatives of six states and ten federal agencies. The division engineer at North Central Division was an active member of the Upper Mississippi River Basin Commission (UMRBC). The establishment of the Upper Mississippi River Basin Commission provided an institutional arrangement capable of implementing the recommendations made in the Upper Mississippi River Comprehensive Basin Study completed in June 1972. The study provided a framework for future studies and resource development. Periodic updating through a national assessment, a Comprehensive Coordinated Joint Plan (CCJP), and a program of Level B studies will keep the framework current in view of new population projections and continuing changes in region needs. The Commission was abolished in 1982. 

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Dubuque, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The city of Dubuque lies on the west bank of the Mississippi River in Dubuque County. The floodplain area within the city covers about 1,100 acres, practically all of which has been extensively developed for industrial, commercial, and residential purposes. A project to protect this area from Mississippi River floods was authorized by the Flood Control Act of 1962. It consisted of the construction of levees and floodwalls along the entire Dubuque riverfront from the Eagle Point Bridge to the downstream end of the city; a 73-foot navigable opening into Dubuque Harbor by means of two miter gates with the sill 11 feet below flat pool; three pumping stations; and related interior drainage facilities. Construction began in 1968 and was completed in 1973. Federal cost of the completed Dubuque project was $10,861,000; non-federal cost was $1,330,000. The net cumulative damage prevented by the project since it went into operation is estimated at $42,070,100. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. 

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Green Bay Levee and Drainage District No. 2, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

Green Bay Levee and Drainage District No. 2, organized as a private district in 1916, covers an area of 13,337 acres fronting the Mississippi River in Lee County, Iowa, downstream from the city of Burlington. The district is flanked by the Skunk River at its upper end. The levees along the Mississippi River and Skunk River were originally constructed by local interests and were improved by the United States in 1948. The total cost of these earlier improvements was $299,000 federal and $691,000 non-federal. The Flood Control Act of 1954 authorized further improvement of the 19.5 miles of levee in the district to provide increased protection. Construction was initiated in 1964 and completed in 1966. Federal cost was $1,728,000 and non-federal cost was estimated at $108,000. The net cumulative damage prevented by the project since initial improvements in 1948 through October 1994 is estimated at $27,768,800. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. An additional levee raise was authorized for construction by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986. A General Reevaluation was initiated for flood damage reduction and was terminated due to lack of economic feasibility.

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Iowa River-Flint Creek Levee District No.16, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

This levee district of about 48,800 acres is located near Wapello, Iowa. It extends along the Mississippi River for about 29 miles in Louis and Des Moines counties. The highly productive bottom lands of the district have been extensively developed for agriculture. The original levees were constructed by the United States between 1886 and 1900 as an aid to navigation. After organization of the levee district in 1895, the United States further participated in improvement of the levee system from time to time. The cost of these earlier improvements was $789,000 federal and $1,774,000 non-federal. The Flood Control Act of 1954 authorized further improvement of the levees of the district to provide increased flood protection. Construction began in 1962 and was completed in 1971. Federal cost was $6,044,000; non-federal cost was estimated at $580,000. The cumulative damage prevented by the project is $71,920,500. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. 

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Muscatine Island Levee District and Muscatine-Louisa County Drainage District No. 13, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The Muscatine Island Levee District and the Muscatine-Louisa County Drainage District No. 13, together with the city of Muscatine, Iowa, formed a joint drainage and flood protection system for 26,478 acres of bottom land. The area is located immediately downstream from the city of Muscatine, in Muscatine and Louisa counties. The area is mainly agricultural, but the downstream portion of the city of Muscatine also lies within the area protected by this system. This portion of Muscatine contains the municipal water and light plant, a number of commercial and industrial establishments, and many dwellings. A small airport used by private planes, railroad lines, and highways is also within the protected area. In 1924, local interests constructed 14 miles of main levee and 1.6 miles of flank levee to protect the area from Mississippi River floods. The federal government participated in improvement of the levee system. The levees were built to withstand floods of 100-year frequency. Some remedial work was required at the Muscatine municipal water and light plant and in connection with railroads, highways, bridges, and interior drainage. Construction began in 1960 and was completed in 1969. The federal cost of the project was $3,293,000; non-federal cost was $422,000. The Water Resource Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized an additional raise of the line of protection. The current project will raise the level of protection from a 100-year event to a 200-year event. The total project cost is $8.72 million of which the federal cost is $6.54 million. The project has been funded for construction in fiscal year 1995.Work nderway in 1995 involves the completion of the project cooperation agreement with the city of Muscatine and the Muscatine Island Levee District and the Army Corps of Engineers. Physical construction will begin in Fiscal Year 1996. The existing project is operated and maintained by local terests. The cumulative damages prevented by the project from 1924 through 1994 is estimated to be $502,799,060. 

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Muscatine, Mad Creek, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The city of Muscatine lies on the west bank of the Mississippi River in Muscatine County. Mad Creek, a small tributary of the Mississippi River with a drainage area of about 17 square miles, bisects the city. Parts of 17 city blocks, in a roughly triangular area, mainly industrial, lie between the right bank of Mad Creek and the Mississippi River and have been flooded frequently during periods of moderately high water on the latter stream. A project for flood protection along Mad Creek at Muscatine was authorized in the Flood Control Act of 1954. The plan of improvement consisted of the construction of a system of floodwalls and levees beginning at Mulberry Street and extending northward for about 1,600 feet along the Mississippi River, and then up the right bank of Mad Creek for about 2,700 feet to high ground north of East 6th Street. Appurtenant works included an intercepting sewer and pumping plant. Construction of the project began in 1958 and was completed in 1960. The federal cost of the project was $1,169,000; non-federal cost was $32,000. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. Since it was completed, it has prevented an estimated $11,684,700 in damages. 

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Sabula, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District
 
The small town of Sabula, with a population of 845, is located on a sandy ridge along the west bank of the Mississippi River in Jackson County. This ridge is separated from the bluffs on the Iowa shore by a wide slough, across which embankments have been built to protect the town from invasion by floodwaters from that side. A high natural bank along most of the town's Mississippi River frontage protects the town on the east. The lood Control Act of 1954 authorized a plan of improvement consisting of construction of several reaches of new levee, raising and strengthening the existing embankments, and constructing appurtenant drainage works. Construction of the project began in 1956 and was completed the following year. The federal cost was $412,000; non-federal cost was $12,000. The net cumulative damage prevented since the project has been in operation (1957 through 1994) is estimated at $1,948,600. The project is operated by local interests.

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Clinton, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

Clinton, Iowa, located at river mile 518.2 above the mouth of the Ohio River, is the county seat of Clinton County and an important manufacturing and retail center of eastern Iowa. In he record flood of 1965, damage at Clinton amounted to more than $5.5 million. More than 50 business and industrial firms were temporarily out of operation, and about 50 square blocks of residential area in the northern and southwestern portions of the city were flooded. Extensive emergency protection works spared the city from even heavier damage. The Flood Control Act of 1968 authorized a project for the protection of the city from floods having a recurrence interval of once in 200 years. The plan included two segments — one along the Mississippi River and Mill Creek, and one along Beaver Slough — and provided for construction of about 8.1 miles of earthen levee and about three-quarters of a mile of concrete floodwall along most of the city's waterfront. Railroad raises, street ramps, closure structures, pumping plants, and gravity drainage outlets also formed a part of the plan. Construction of the Clinton project began in August 1974 and was completed in 1981. Local interests operate and maintain the project. The federal government is presently developing plans to install an anchored erosion control mat on approximately 700 feet of levee berm along River Drive in Clinton. The mat will be designed to stop erosion along the levee slope. The federal cost of the project is estimated at $300,000 and non-federal cost at $100,000. The net cumulative damages prevented by the project since it was completed is estimated at $16,985,000.

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Bettendorf, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The city of Bettendorf is located on the west bank of the Mississippi River at river mile 485.7 above the mouth of the Ohio River. It is one of a group of cities which extends for about 10 miles along the bank of the Mississippi River in Scott County, Iowa, and Rock Island County, Ill., forming a continuous metropolitan area. In the record flood of 1965, flood damage at Bettendorf amounted to $1.3 million. The flood problem area consists of about 470 acres, which has been extensively developed for industrial and commercial purposes. Only a few residential units are located in the area. The Bettendorf Flood Protection project was authorized by Public Law 90-483, and approved Aug. 13, 1968, substantially in accordance with House Document No. 348, 90th Congress, 2nd session. Preconstruction planning funds were made available in fiscal year 1971. The revised General Design Memorandum was approved in 1981. The project consists of approximately 3 miles of levee, 2,200 feet of concrete floodwall, two pump stations, two new railroad bridges across Duck Creek, eight gatewells and two ponding areas, together with an early warning system for the entire project. The project provides a high degree of protection against floods on the Mississippi River and Duck Creek for Bettendorf. The total cost of the project was approximately $14.8 million. The city paid $1.5 million to provide rights-of-way, utility relocations and other incidental items. The damage prevented since the completion of the project is estimated at $55,368,000.

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Burlington, Completed Project, Section 205
Rock Island District

Burlington lies on the west bank of the Mississippi River in Des Moines County, Iowa. An industrial area of about 223 acres, the community is on low ground and subject to flooding from the Mississippi River and from Flint Creek, a small tributary stream. Consideration was given to providing flood protection to the industrial area which lies downstream from the mouth of Flint Creek. The project consisted of about 1.5 miles of earth levee, a section of concrete floodwall, interior drainage facilities, and two railroad closure structures. A detailed project report was approved in May 1977. Construction started in 1982 and was completed in 1984. Federal costs were $3,114,000 and non-federal costs were $477,000. Net cumulative damage prevented by the project is $12,639,200.

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Muscatine, Mad Creek Completed Project, Section 205
Rock Island District 

The project is located on the right bank of Mad Creek, a short distance upstream from the confluence of that stream with the Mississippi River at mile 455.8 above the mouth of the Ohio River, in the city of Muscatine, Iowa. The project provides local protection to a 75-acre industrial area in Muscatine from coincidental floods on Mad Creek and the Mississippi River. The site is upstream from a previous federal flood control project on Mad Creek completed in 1961. The project consists of 1,010 feet of earth levees, 240 feet of concrete flood walls, a ponding area, a street closure, gatewalls, a bridge raise and railroad track modifications. Construction was started in 1977. Completed in 1983, federal costs for the project were $1,129,800; non-federal costs, $50,000.

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Snagging and Clearing Mississippi River Main Stem, Completed Projects, Section 208 
Rock Island District 

Section 208 of the Flood Control Act of 1954 authorizes the Corps of Engineers to spend up to $500,000 on any single tributary during any one fiscal year for the removal of accumulated snags and other debris, and for the clearing and straightening of stream channels when, in the opinion of the chief of engineers, such work is definitely in the interest of flood control. 

Snagging and Clearing Projects — In 1966, a project was undertaken in the downstream reaches of Blackhawk Creek, a small Mississippi River tributary at Davenport, Iowa. The work consisted of clearing and excavating an improved outlet for the creek to reduce flooding in adjacent urban areas. Federal cost was $64,287. — In 1980, a project was undertaken on Michael Creek, a small Mississippi River tributary in Louisa County to reduce flooding of agricultural lands. Federal cost was $74,240. — In 1982, a project was undertaken for snagging and clearing on Fork, French, and Dry creeks, small tributaries of the Mississippi River at Fort Madison, Iowa, to reduce urban flooding. The work consisted of excavating accumulated sediment from the mouth of the creeks upstream to U.S. Highway 61. Federal cost of the three projects was $200,278. — In 1981, a logjam was removed and disposed of under the authority of Section 208, on the South Skunk River in Mahaska County, Iowa. The final federal cost of the snagging and clearing project was $43,694. 

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Coon Rapids Dam to Mouth of Ohio River Study, Completed, Local Protection
Rock Island District 

The purpose of this study, authorized by resolution of the House Committee on Public Works on Dec. 11, 1969 was to determine the feasibility of modifying existing projects in the interest of providing greater flood protection. The study considered flood control improvements in drainage and levee districts that have had extensive urban development. Interim reports have been issued recommending improving the flood protection projects in the Muscatine Island Levee District, Iowa, and the South Quincy Drainage and Levee District, Ill. In 1980, the scope of the study authority was broadened to consider hydropower development at the Mississippi River locks and dams. Hydropower potential on the Mississippi River dams in the St. Paul and Rock Island districts was subsequently evaluated and outlined in numerous hydropower reports. A final report on additional study authority was completed in 1986 and concluded that flood damage reduction improvements were not warranted and that hydropower developments could be completed by private developers. The report is currently undergoing Washington level review.

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Quad-Cities Urban Study, Study Completed
Rock Island District 

This study was authorized in 1974 and has been endorsed by the Bi-State Metropolitan Planning Commission, a group comprised of elected officials of various cities and counties in the Quad-City area. The commission directs the regional planning effort of the Davenport-Rock Island-Moline, Iowa and Illinois Standard Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a major manufacturing, wholesale, and retail trade center. The study objectives were to make an overall evaluation of land use, navigation, flood protection, water supply, water quality, and water-based recreation. The study was completed in fiscal year 81. 

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Clinton, Beaver Slough, Mississippi River, Completed Project
Rock Island District

Beaver Slough is a 4.8 mile by-channel of the Mississippi River, at Clinton, Iowa. It is separated from the Mississippi River main channel by Beaver Island and lies within pool 14. Several important docking facilities are located along the mainland shore on Beaver Slough, including a municipal river terminal built and controlled by the city of Clinton, and dockage facilities of a milling company and a power company.Congress authorized improvement of Beaver Slough in 1958 as a feature of the Upper Mississippi River Nine-foot Channel Project to assure continued operation of existing terminal facilities. The improvements consisted of dredging a channel nine feet deep and 250 feet wide through the slough and constructing a rock-dike regulating structure at the head of Beaver Island. The regulating structure constricts the channel at the head of the slough and increases the velocity of flow in the reach adjacent to the terminal, thus reducing silt deposition in that area. Construction was accomplished in 1961-62 at a federal cost of $193,000. The federal government performs periodic maintenance dredging. 

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Dubuque Commercial Harbor, Completed Project
Rock Island District

The Dubuque commercial harbor is located in a small bay of the Mississippi River, approximately 1,200 feet long and 400 feet wide, along the city's riverfront. The River and Harbor Act of 1960 authorized federal improvement of the harbor as a feature of the Upper Mississippi River Nine-foot Channel Project. The harbor was dredged to a project depth of nine feet to permit its use by commercial traffic operating on the Upper Mississippi River. The project was accomplished in 1961 at a federal cost of $55,200. The federal government performs periodic maintenance dredging. 

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Lock No. 19, Completed Project
Rock Island District
 
Lock No. 19 is located on the Iowa shore at Keokuk. The lock, 110 feet wide by 1,200 feet long, was built to accommodate modern river traffic and replaced the old lock at this location which was 110 feet wide by 358 feet long. The original lock, drylock, and dam structures were built in the early 1900s by a private power company. The lock was integrated into the nine-foot channel system, but long delays were experienced due to the small, slow operating lock. Construction of the lock was authorized by the River and Harbor Act of July 3, 1930, as amended. Construction began in November 1952 and the lock was placed in operation in May 1957. The total cost was $13,132,000. 

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Old Lock No. 19, Completed Project, Rehabilitation
Rock Island District
 
The project is located on the west bank of the Mississippi River at Keokuk, Iowa. The rehabilitation project consisted of providing a permanent closure of old Lock No. 19 and drydock by the placement of a cellular sheet pile wall across the upstream end of the river closure from the power company property to the riverwall of the new lock. The old lock and drydock structures were completed in 1912 with non-federal funding. A new 1,200-foot lock was constructed adjacent to the old lock in 1957. The old lock and drydock structures were in an advanced state of deterioration and did not meet Corps of Engineers stability criteria. Lock 19 has a lift of 39 feet, and impounds pool 19 which is used for generation of commercial hydropower, in addition to being an integral part of the nine-foot channel project. The collapse of either the old lock or drydock would result in the stoppage of navigation on the Upper Mississippi River, as well as a loss of generating capacity by the Union Electric Company. Construction on the project began in 1978 and was ompleted in the fall of 1979 at a cost of $4,286,042. 

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Old Lock No. 14, Completed Project, Major Rehabilitation
Rock Island District

This project is located on the west bank of the Mississippi River at LeClaire, Iowa. Rehabilitation work on the lock included replacing the miter gates and the miter gate operating machinery, the gate valves and operating machinery, rewiring electrical service, resurfacing concrete walls, and providing a new control house. This lock was constructed in 1922 as part of the six-foot channel project. After construction of the newer and larger lock in 1939, this lock was considered an auxiliary lock and used only for access of Corps of Engineers boats to the Rock Island District's service and maintenance area. In 1969, it was returned to operation for pleasure craft use on weekends and holidays from Memorial Day through Labor Day. The old lock was in advanced stages of structural and mechanical deterioration. Structural and mechanical failures were common and required emergency repairs to keep the facility in operation. Project construction began in 1978 and was completed in 1981 at a federal cost of $8 million. 

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Recreational Navigation, Clinton Harbor, Completed Project
Rock Island District

The small-boat harbor in Clinton was authorized in 1962 as a feature of the Upper Mississippi River Nine-foot Channel Project to accommodate recreational vessels and other small craft. It consists of a breakwater between Joyce Island and Willow Island and the dredging of the protected area to a project depth of 5 feet. Construction of the harbor was finished in 1979. Federal cost was $102,400. Local interests are required to operate the project, with the federal government performing periodic maintenance dredging. 

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Davenport Lindsay Park Harbor, Completed Project
Rock Island District 

This harbor was authorized in 1950 as a feature of the Upper Mississippi River Nine-foot Channel Project to accommodate recreational vessels and other small craft. It is located on the west bank of the Mississippi River near the upstream limits of Davenport, about 1.2 miles upstream from Lock and Dam No. 15. It consists of a rock breakwater enclosure to accommodate 200 resident craft plus transient craft. The harbor depth is five feet. The harbor was built in 1961 at a federal cost of $262,100. Local interests are required to operate the project, with the federal government performing periodic maintenance dredging. 

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Fort Madison Harbor, Completed Project
Rock Island District

The small-boat harbor at Fort Madison was authorized in 1948 as a feature of the Upper Mississippi River Nine-foot Channel Project to accommodate recreational vessels and other small craft. It consists of a breakwater and the dredging of a protected area and entrance channel to a project depth of 5 feet. The harbor was built in 1960-1961 at a federal cost of $184,200. Local interests are required to operate the project, with the federal government performing periodic maintenance dredging. 

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Muscatine Harbor, Completed Project
Rock Island District 

The small-boat harbor at Muscatine was authorized in 1950 as a feature of the Upper Mississippi River Nine-foot Channel Project to accommodate recreational vessels and other small craft. It consists of a breakwater and dredging within the protected area to a project depth of five feet. The harbor was built in 1959 to 1961. A downstream arm was added to the harbor in 1964 to protect small craft in the harbor from prevailing westerly winds. Federal cost of the project was $353,000. Local interests are required to operate the project, with the federal government performing periodic maintenance dredging. 

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Dry Run Creek, Oelwein, Study Complete, Section 205
Rock Island District

The feasibility study plan consists of about 3,500 feet of channel improvements. Plans and specifications were substantially completed in August 1990 and the project has an estimated total cost of $374,073 - $280,550 federal cost and $93,518 non-federal cost. The Local Cooperation Agreement was executed in January 1991. The construction contract was awarded in February 1994. Work is scheduled for completion by the end of 1995. The project will be owned and operated by local interests. 

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Turkey River, Elkport, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The town of Elkport, in Clayton County, lies at the junction of the Turkey River and Elk Creek. Floods on those streams, particularly Elk Creek, which originates in steep terrain and has a high stream gradient, have threatened the town in the past. A local flood protection project at Elkport was authorized in 1944. Construction of the project, which consisted of a levee and appurtenant works for protection of the town, was completed in 1949. Cost of the project included $34,200 federal expense and $5,000 non-federal expense. The net cumulative damage prevented since completion of the project (1949 through September 1994) is estimated to be $767,600. Local interests operate and maintain the project. 

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Iowa River, Coralville Lake, Completed Project, Reservoir
Rock Island District 

The Coralville Lake project is located on the Iowa River upstream from Iowa City in Johnson County, and is a part of the general comprehensive plan for flood control and other purposes in the Upper Mississippi River region. The project was authorized under the general authorization contained in the Flood Control Act approved June 28, 1938. Construction began on this project in July 1949 and was completed and put into operation in February 1958. It consists of an earth-fill dam rising approximately 100 feet above the streambed, a 500-foot uncontrolled spillway, and outlet works to control a flood pool of 24,800 acres. The dam controls runoff from 3,084 square miles of land above the dam and provides protection to 1,703 square miles below the dam.As a modification of the project, Congress authorized the construction of a highway bridge across the lake at the Mehaffey site in 1960. Construction of the Mehaffey Bridge was started in June 1964 and was completed late in 1966. Federal cost was $1,365,000 and Johnson County, Iowa, made a cash contribution of $100,000. The completed bridge is being maintained by the county. Coralville Lake substantially reduces the average annual flood damage for urban areas and agricultural lands along the Iowa River below the dam. It also reduces flood crests on the Mississippi River below the mouth of the Iowa River. Benefits also accrue to conservation and recreation. The net cumulative damages prevented since the project has been in operation (1958 through September 1994) are estimated at $49.1 million. A 1992 raise in the conservation pool from 680 National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD) to 683 NGVD now forms a permanent lake of 5,430 acres stretching 23 miles upstream of the dam. A spring conservation pool level drawdown to 679 NGVD is provided for from February 15 to June 15 under normal operations. Coralville Lake is the fourth largest body of water which now exists in the state of Iowa. Because of its proximity to Iowa City and Cedar Rapids, and its location in a prosperous, well-populated farming area, the project provides excellent recreational opportunities and supplements the facilities provided by the state at adjacent Lake Macbride State Park. In order to provide the best possible use of the project area, a comprehensive master plan for recreational purposes and land management was prepared in 1977. Recreational development as presented in the master plan has been attained. Significant recreational benefits are being realized by the general public.The aesthetic appeal of the lake setting lends itself to many forms of outdoor recreation, such as camping, boating, hiking, fishing, picnicking and swimming. Visitors to Coralville will find shaded camp sites with high-quality facilities to serve their needs. The rolling meadows and wooded hills provide ample opportunity for sightseeing, picnicking, or just relaxing in the great outdoors. Woodpecker Nature Trail is a self-guided trail which winds along the shore of the lake, providing opportunities to see and hear nature as well as the effects of man's interaction with nature. Bass, bluegill, crappie, and channel catfish, along with many other species of fish are available in the lake to challenge the skill of the fisherman, whether an experienced angler or novice. Flows through the outlet works of the dam create fishing opportunities unique in this reach of the lake of the Iowa River. Fishing is not restricted to the summer months since ice cover on the lake provides the setting for the hardy sport of ice fishing. Throughout much of the lake area, especially in the upper reaches, the hunter finds squirrel, rabbit, pheasant, whitetail deer, and many species of waterfowl. Recreational facilities are provided by the Corps of Engineers at 12 sites within the lake area. For the convenience of the recreating public, three commercial concession leases have been granted at strategic points along the lake. These concessions have such items as marine gas, oil, bait, tackle, rented boats, and numerous other services. Land is also leased to the University of Iowa for a recreation area and to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR), forming part of MacBride State Park. Picnic tables, fireplaces, water supply systems, and other facilities are available at the Corps-developed recreational areas. A tract of 13,000 acres has been licensed to the Iowa DNR for wildlife conservation and management. The Coralville Lake operation plan has been modified since 1958 to provide for the seasonal changes in the elevation of the lake's conservation pool. This has resulted in some of the lands and roads located within the flood control pool being inundated more frequently and for longer durations than was predicted at the time of initial land acquisition. The Corps of Engineers is in the process of concluding acquisition of additional interests in the real estate that is affected, in order to compensate for any increase in flooding caused by the modified plan of operation. The acquisition includes purchasing fee title to some areas where there is now only an easement to flood, and also acquiring easements to permanently flood areas where there is now only an easement to flood occasionally. The Coralville Lake project is maintained and operated by the Corps of Engineers. 

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Iowa River, Marshalltown, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District 

The city of Marshalltown is located on the Iowa River in Marshall County. Approximately 725 acres of the city are located in the Iowa River floodplain and about 500 acres are located in the floodplain of Linn Creek, a tributary stream.A project to provide flood protection at Marshalltown was authorized in the 1965 Flood Control Act. It consists of levees, floodwalls, bridges, channel improvements, and interior drainage facilities on the Iowa River and Linn Creek. Federal cost was $8,376,000 (estimated non-federal cost was $2,190,000).Construction began in May 1972 and was completed in 1977. Damages prevented since the project's completion are estimated at $13,270,900. Local interests operate and maintain the project. 

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Cedar River and Black Hawk Creek, Waterloo, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The city of Waterloo is located along both banks of the Cedar River in Black Hawk County. Black Hawk Creek is a right-bank tributary entering the Cedar River within the city. Waterloo is a rapidly growing industrial city, with major manufacturing and commercial development along the riverbanks. On a number of occasions, extensive damage in the city has been caused by floods on the Cedar River and Black Hawk Creek. The Flood Control Act of 1965 authorized a project along both banks of the Cedar River and Black Hawk Creek within the city to protect against floods having an average recurrence interval of 100 years. A levee and floodwall system about 17 miles long was completed in 1985. Related improvements include eight pumping plants, pondage areas, modification of interior drainage facilities, numerous closure structures for streets and railroad, a ring levee around the city sewage treatment plant, a small dam and storage reservoir on Virden Creek, and other works. The Corps project was coordinated with a plan for renewal and beautification of the city's downtown central area. Aesthetics were a major consideration in the floodwall design of this project. The federal cost of the project was $48,970,000; non-federal cost was $15 million for right-of-way and relocations. Construction began in September 1972 and was completed in August 1985. Local interests own, operate, and maintain the project. 

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Iowa River, Marengo, Completed Project, Section 205
Rock Island District

Authorized in 1977 under the provisions of Section 205 of the 1948 Flood Control Act, the Marengo project is located on the Iowa River and Bear Creek in Iowa County, Iowa. The project consists of levees, improvement of an existing levee, and interior drainage facilities. Construction was initiated in 1978 and completed in 1981. The federal cost was $2,447,000 and non-federal cost was $130,000. 

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Cedar River, Evansdale, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District

Evansdale is located on the left bank of the Cedar River, about 194 miles above the confluence of that stream with the Iowa River, in Black Hawk County, Iowa. The flood control project was authorized by Section 201 on Oct. 27, 1965. Local protection from the Cedar River and Elk Run Creek is provided to the city of Evansdale by a 3.2 mile long system of levees with appurtenant closures, ramps, and interior drainage facilities. About 1.1 miles of the embankment for Interstate 380 was used as levee. The project was initiated in 1981 and completed in 1982. Federal costs were $4,409,000; non-federal costs were $370,000. Net cumulative damage prevented since 1982 is $1,713,000. 

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Iowa River and Deer Creek, Tama, Study Completed, Section 205
Rock Island District

A 1989 Definite Project Report recommended a $4,252,000 flood control project, consisting of a three-mile-long levee to protect Tama from 100-year floods on the Iowa River and Deer Creek. Also included in the project are a 146-acre-foot ponding area and a 35,000 gallon per minute pumping station to evacuate interior drainage. The Local Cooperation Agreement was executed in August 1990. Project construction was initiated in late 1991. The project was completed in March 1995. 

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Snagging And Clearing, Skunk River, Completed Project, Section 208
Rock Island District

Section 208 of the Flood Control Act of 1954 authorizes the Corps of Engineers to spend up to $250,000 on any single tributary during any one fiscal year for removal of accumulated snags and other debris, and for the clearing and straightening of stream channels. This is done when, in the opinion of the chief of engineers, such work is definitely in the interest of flood control. 

In 1969 and 1970, a new channel about 1,000 feet in length was cut for the Skunk River in Steady Run Township, Keokuk County, to by-pass a reach obstructed by drift and debris. Federal cost was $40,195. 

In 1992, another Section 208 study was completed for a log jam located between Hayesville and Martinsburg in Keokuk County. The project lacked economic feasibility, and the study was terminated. 

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Des Moines River, Red Rock Dam and Lake Red Rock, Completed Project, Reservoir
Rock Island District

The Red Rock Dam and Lake Red Rock project on the Des Moines River is chiefly in Marion County, but extends into Jasper, Warren, and Polk Counties. The dam is approximately 60 miles downstream from the city of Des Moines. The project is a unit of the comprehensive plan for flood control and other purposes in the Upper Mississippi River region. Flood protection is provided to 36,000 acres of agricultural lands in the Des Moines River Basin and to the cities and towns of Ottumwa, Eldon, Eddyville, Keosauqua, and Farmington. Along the Mississippi River, downstream from the mouth of the Des Moines River, levee districts and the cities of Quincy, Ill., and Canton, La Grange, and Hannibal, Mo., also benefit. The project was authorized under the general authorization contained in the Flood Control Act approved June 28, 1938. The plan of improvement provided for construction of a dam consisting of a rolled earthfill embankment and a gravity-type concrete spillway with crest gates, located near the center valley, with each end tied into the embankment by a gravity- type non-overflow, concrete section. The dam, at a crest elevation of 797 feet above mean sea level, is approximately 5,676 feet long and a maximum height of 110 feet above the valley floor. The drainage area above the dam site is 12,323 square miles. With the flood control pool full, the reservoir area is 65,500 acres. A 1992 raise in the conservation pool from 734 National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD) to 742 NGVD now forms a permanent lake of 19,000 surface acres upstream of the dam. Federal cost of the project was $88,838,000. The 13,000 acre surface area of Lake Red Rock provides the nucleus for a multitude of recreational activities. Twelve recreation areas are available for public use. The Corps of Engineers manages nine of the areas, the state of Iowa manages two, and Marion County manages one. These areas provide basic facilities such as access roads, boat-launching ramps, fresh running water, camping, and picnic areas. They also include two overlook areas where visitors may sightsee or just enjoy the beauty of a summer day. Boats, bait, gasoline, food, and other items are provided by concessionaires operating by lease under the supervision of the Corps. One of the areas managed by the state of Iowa includes 25,450 acres of land at the upper end of the lake that has been licensed to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources for wildlife conservation and management. Boating, camping, and fishing are the most popular activities today; but after development of certain project lands, waterfowl hunting may become one of the dominant recreational pursuits during the fall. Development of future sites will be done as the need and demand require. The development will be accomplished with other non- federal agencies. The net cumulative damage prevented since the project has been in operation (1969 through September 1994) is estimated at $390,825,400. The Red Rock Dam and Lake Red Rock project is operated by the Corps of Engineers. 

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Des Moines River, Des Moines, Completed Project, Local Protection
Rock Island District
 
This project, authorized by the 1944 Flood Control Act, protects the city of Des Moines from Des Moines and Raccoon river floods up to a frequency of once in 100 years. It includes a system of levees and floodwalls, bridge raises, and the repair and provision of gates on existing sewage outlets.The federal cost of the project was $4,993,000; non- federal costs were $407,000. Construction of this project began in 1966 and was completed in 1971. Total damages prevented through October 1994 are estimated at $23.7 million. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. 

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Des Moines River, Ottumwa, Completed Project
Rock Island District 

During the period from 1956 to 1964, the city of Ottumwa constructed a flood protection system along the Des Moines River consisting of levees, floodwalls, channel improvements, interceptor, sewers, and pumping plants. A narrow strip of flood plain about three-quarters of a mile long on the left bank of the river, containing part of the city's business district, remained subject to basement flooding when the combined north side storm and sanitary sewer was overtaxed by heavy local runoff. The federal project consisted of improvement of the discharge efficiency of the sewer by providing additional gate openings in the sewer, through which high flows would discharge directly into the Des Moines River. Construction began in 1976 and was completed in March 1977. Total federal cost of the project was $233,000. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. 

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Raccoon River, Van Meter, Completed Project, Section 205
Rock Island District

The town of Van Meter is located on the right bank of the Raccoon River, a tributary of the Des Moines River, in Dallas County, in central Iowa. A small, unnamed creek rises in the bluffs south of the town, passes through the town, and enters the Raccoon River. Floods on the creek are generally flash floods and damage has been sustained throughout almost the entire town on several occasions. The work consisted of an enlarged and straightened channel for the creek through the town, an earth levee paralleling the left bank of the new channel, and modification of drainage facilities. Construction of this project began in July 1964 and was completed in November 1964 at a federal cost of $113,842; non-federal cost was $22,000. Total damages prevented through September 1994 are estimated to be $1,841,870. The project is operated and maintained by local interests. 

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Des Moines River, Iowa And Minnesota, Study Completed, Local Protection
Rock Island District

The study purpose was to consider flood control and related concerns in the Des Moines River Basin, particularly in that part of the basin upstream from Red Rock Dam and Lake Red Rock.The report was completed in 1975. The only project recommended for authorization was one for local flood protection at the city of West Des Moines and a portion of the city of Des Moines, which consists of about five miles of new and improved earth levee and 600 feet of concrete floodwall which would provide protection from flooding on the Raccoon River, Walnut Creek, and Jordan Creek. The project was authorized in November 1986 by Public Law 99-662. 

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Raccoon River, Des Moines, Study Completed, Section 205
Rock Island District

The Feasibility Phase Study was completed in May 1988 to reduce flood damages along the river in the vicinity of Valley and Fleur Drives in Des Moines, Iowa. The recommended plan consists of improvements and additions up to the 100-year level for about 7,000 feet of the existing levee system, to protect the mixed residential, commercial, and light industrial areas near Waterworks Park and Gray's Lake. After the Great Flood of 1993 on the Raccoon River, the 100-year protection level was updated, resulting in an increase in levee height. The estimated total cost of the project is $3.4 million. A Stage I construction contract was awarded in November 1994 with a scheduled completion date of December 1995. A Stage II contract for a major railroad closure is in the plans and specifications phase, and the local sponsor is coordinating the required right-of-way acquisition and relocations. 

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Iowa Section 22 Studies, Study Completed
Rock Island District
 
Demands for water are projected to increase significantly in the middle and lower Des Moines River Basin in the future. This study was initiated in fiscal year 1976 at the request of the Iowa Natural Resources Council to develop a comprehensive plan for providing increased supplies of water for domestic, municipal, agricultural, and industrial uses. The sources investigated included the existing Saylorville and Red Rock reservoir projects constructed by the Corps of Engineers, other surface storage sites, increased use of ground water, and water recycling. A technical report evaluating the potential of Red Rock and Saylorville to provide additional storage for water supplies to downstream users was completed in 1979. As an outcome of the study, the state of Iowa purchased 2.28 percent of the total flood control storage for water supply purposes as approved by the assistant secretary of the Army, Civil Works in 1982. The state of Iowa subsequently subcontracted the total contracted water supply storage to two utilities. The contract is ongoing. 

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Iowa River, Wapello, Completed, Streambank Erosion Demonstration Project
Rock Island District

Wapello lies on the right bank of the Iowa River about 16 miles above its confluence with the Mississippi River. The river makes an approximately 90 degree bend at the upstream end of the community, and the riverbank there has been eroding.  Improvements for bank erosion control at Wapello were considered as a part of the Iowa and Cedar River Study. Investigations indicated that improvements were not economically justifiable under that authority. The erosion problem at Wapello, however, was selected as one of the demonstration projects under the 1974 streambank erosion prevention and control demonstration program. The demonstration project plan at Wapello consisted of the construction of a combination of permeable timber jetties, erosion control mat, and steel jacks to control the bank erosion. Construction of the project was completed in 1978. The complete project was monitored for three years to evaluate the effectiveness of the three types of erosion control measures. After the three year-period, the timber panels and the concrete erosion control mat were structurally and functionally sound. The steel jacks were damaged beyond repair by ice action. The city of Wapello requested that the jacks be removed prior to transferring the project, and operation and maintenance responsibilities, to the city and this was done. On Feb. 23, 1982, the project was officially transferred to the city of Wapello along with operation and maintenance responsibilities. The Corps of Engineers inspects the project annually. 

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Nevada, Iowa, Section 205 - West Branch Indian Creek, Study Completed
Rock Island District

A reconnaissance study was initiated in January 1992. The study investigated flood damage reduction measures for a residential and county fairgrounds area in Nevada. None of the measures were economically justified. The negative report was completed and North Central Division concurred on Aug. 21, 1992. 

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Maxwell, Iowa, Section 205 - Indian and Rock Creeks, Study Completed
Rock Island District

A reconnaissance study was initiated in January 1992 to investigate flood damages to residential and commercial properties. The negative report was completed and North Central Division concurred on Nov. 16, 1992. 

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Iowa and Cedar Rivers, Iowa and Minnesota, Study Completed, Local Protection 
Rock Island District

A study of the Iowa and Cedar Rivers was authorized by resolution of the House Committee on Flood Control on July 16, 1945, and by resolution of the Senate Committee on Commerce on Aug. 6, 1945, with later modifications. Its purpose is to investigate the advisability of providing flood protection and to consider related water needs within the river basins. A special report investigating the effects of Coralville Lake operations, particularly in the reservoir area and downstream, was completed in 1978. Public meetings were held in 1966 to help identify and discuss problems and needs. Preliminary investigations for urban and rural flood problems and drainage problems have been completed for various locations throughout the basin. Three projects have been authorized for construction as a result of interim reports submitted under this investigation - Waterloo, Marshalltown, and Evansdale. A final report considering the remaining flood problems in the river basin was completed in 1984. No additional projects were recommended for construction.

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Mississippi River Mast Tree Planting Project
Rock Island District

AUTHORITY: Section 1135 of the Water Resources Development Act, as amended (Modifications for Improvement of the Environment).

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: IA-01, IA-02, IL-17

BACKGROUND: The Rock Island District manages approximately 54,000 acres of forested wetlands along the Mississippi River in the States of Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin, and Missouri. Pre- and post-project impacts have altered the character of the historic forest. A portion of Long Island was cleared for agriculture prior to the construction of the 9-Foot Channel Navigation Project. During the 1940s and 1950s, Corps of Engineers logging reduced the amount of mast-producing trees which provided a valuable source of food for wildlife. Subsequent Federal protection and changes in land use practices allowed a natural reversion of much of the affected area back to forest. This new forest growth is dominated by early successional species such as cottonwood, silver maple, and elm, rather than mast-producing trees which provide better quality wildlife habitat. The proposed project will restore an oak-walnut-pecan component to 558 acres of bottom land forest by a combination of direct seeding, and bare root and large stock plantings. The tree establishment process consisted of planting plus follow-up control of undesirable competing species for 2 years afterwards. There is no requirement for future maintenance after the establishment period. Regeneration by direct seeding (acorns), regeneration by planting bare root seedlings, regeneration by planting large stock seedlings, and no action. Trees Forever agreed to assume 25 percent of the project costs at Pleasant Creek and Huron Island. American Forests, through their Global ReLeaf program, agreed to assume 25% of the project costs at Long Island. There is no requirement for future maintenance. These are the first and only non-profit Section 1135 project sponsors in the country. Goals for enhanced wildlife habitat are fully supported by a 1961 Cooperative Agreement between the Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife (USFWS). The Illinois Department of Natural Resources strongly endorsed the proposed planting. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources concurs with the proposal to establish mast trees on state-managed lands on Huron Island. Restoration of the oak component to the Huron and Pleasant Creek Sites augments regeneration efforts initiated by the Mississippi River Natural Resources Forest Management Program. The project is complete. All planting was completed by November 1996. The remaining contract tasks which included herbiciding and mowing were completed on the last planting sites in Sept 1998. A fiscal close-out of project costs is also complete. The project cost approximately $372,000.

LOCATION: The Mississippi River Mast Tree Planting Project is located within the Rock Island District at Pleasant Creek, Huron Island, and Long Island. These three sites are adjacent to the Mississippi River in Pools 13, 18, and 21, respectively. Two planting areas are located at the Pleasant Creek Site, Pool 13, River Mile 552, approximately 4 miles south of the town of Bellevue in Jackson County, Iowa. The Huron Island site contains 8 planting areas, and is located in Pool 18, River Mile 424, in Des Moines County, Iowa. A large planting area is located on Long Island, Pool 21, River Miles 334-340, 5 miles north of the city of Quincy in Adams County, Illinois.

CURRENT STATUS: Project Completed and Closed-out.

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Highway 52, Mississippi River at Bellevue, Jackson County, Iowa
Rock Island District

Authority - Section 14 of the 1946 Flood Control Act (Public Law [P.L.] 79-526), as amended.

Location - West (right descending) riverbank of the Mississippi River, adjacent to Highway 52 in Bellevue, Iowa, Township 86 North, Range 5 East, Section 18.

Problems and Opportunities - With each period of high water, the stream bank made up of alluvial sand and wind blown loess erodes along the Mississippi River shoreline.  The erosion and sloughing are threatening the stability of the toe and roadway embankment slope parallel to Highway 52, a transportation route that averages 3,620 vehicles a day (Iowa Department of Transportation).  Loss of this road would be a hardship to area residents, business owners, and sightseers. 

Alternative Plans Considered - Five alternatives were considered during the plan formulation process:  (1) placement of Iowa Class B riprap for toe and bank protection to the top of bank; (2) placement of a concrete-filled mattress along the bank with riprap at the toe and upper end; (3) selective vegetative plantings as a bioengineering measure; (4) a combination of riprap toe protection and selective native grass seeding above the high water elevation mark, and (5) the no action alternative. 

Implementation Schedule - Contract award occurred August 9, 2001 and construction of the project was completed in the fall of 2001. 

Status: Completed and closed out.

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Lock & Dam 14, Mississippi River, Iowa (Major Rehabilitation & Major Maintenance)
Rock Island District

Authorization - River and Harbor Act of 1930, S.D. #126/71/2.

Status - The Rehabilitation Evaluation Report (RER) was approved August 1993.  The project was a FY 1996 Construction General major rehabilitation new start.

Background - The project’s Construction General funded items are cost shared (50/50) with the Inland Waterway Trust Fund.  Operation & Maintenance funded items are 100% Federal.  The project is located at Mississippi River Mile 493.3, near the city of Le Claire, in Scott County, Iowa.  The facility is a unit of the Inland Waterway Navigation System of the Upper Mississippi River Basin and is one of 29 such facilities between Minneapolis, Minnesota, and St. Louis, Missouri.  The lock chamber is 600 feet long by 110 feet wide and has a maximum lift of 11 feet.  A 320-foot long by 80-foot wide auxiliary lock is located adjacent to the Iowa side of the channel.  The dam is 2,703 feet long and consists of a 1,343-foot gated section and a 1,360-foot non-submersible earth and rock dike section. The Major Rehabilitation (CG/IWTF) & Major Maintenance (O&M) work is awarded and executed concurrently and will be accomplished in two stages.

- Stage I, Lock, involved the rehabilitation of the navigation lock chamber and associated appurtenances.  Major work items included resurfacing monolith joints in the lock chamber, rehabilitation of the miter gates, installation of a bubbler system in the lock chamber, replacing the lock machinery and overall site electrical systems.  This was the first project that the District utilized a Request For Proposal (RFP) to procure the Stage I, Lock contract.  The content of the RFP consisted of a technical and cost proposal.  This method was chosen to address the river industries and our concerns regarding reopening the lock on time after lock closure.    The construction contract was awarded in December 1996 and was completed May 1999.  The final cost of the contract is $12,000,000.

- Stage II, Dam, involves the rehabilitation of the navigation dam.  Major work includes the replacement of roller and tainter gate chain hoisting equipment, replacement of tainter gate chains, repair of roller gate chains, removal and replacement of deteriorated concrete on the dam piers, and sandblasting and painting of the tainter and roller gates.  The construction contract was awarded in September 1998 and is scheduled for completion in September 2001.  The estimated final cost of the contract is $9,500,000.

Summarized Financial Data - Estimated Federal Cost (Construction) = $18,430,000, (O&M) - $11,000,000; Estimated Non-Federal Cost (Construction) = $0, (O&M) = $0; Cash (Construction) = $0, (O&M) = $0; Other (Construction) = $0, (O&M) = $0; Total Estimated Project Cost (Construction) = $18,430,000, (O&M) = $11,000,000

Status: Completed and closed out.

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Red Rock Dam, Lake Red Rock, Iowa, SE Des Moines Remedial Works Levee Erosion
Rock Island District

Authorization - Flood Control Act of 1938

Congressional District(S): IA-03

Statement of the Issue: Erosion of the riverbank in this area is severe and could result in a breach of the levee system. Congressional interest, through Congressional adds, has maintained this project for the last three years.

Background: The SE Des Moines Remedial Works Levee was built as part of the Lake Red Rock Flood Protection Project. The levee system protects an industrial area of SE Des Moines from backwaters of Lake Red Rock. Included within the industrial area is a large wastewater treatment plant for the Des Moines metropolitan area, a couple of chemical plants and a grain elevator, a petroleum storage and distribution center, and large power generating plant, and other industrial buildings. The levee is experiencing active and significant erosion from both the Des Moines River and Four Mile Creek. Areas in need of repair and riprap protection include: 2,050 feet of levee along the Des Moines River adjacent to the Des Moines Metropolitan Wastewater Reclamation Facility (Stages I and IIA) and approximately 1,000 feet of levee along the Des Moines River immediately upstream of the power plant floodwall (Stage IIB) along with approximately 400 feet of levee along Four Mile Creek (Stage IIC). Failure to allocate funding for revetment repairs will result in further erosion and run the risk of the levee breaching at an elevation it was designed and built to withstand. The risk of erosion cutting all the way through the levee is dependent on the intensity of storm events and resulting runoff. The Corps of Engineers would become subject to litigation resulting from damages incurred from a levee failure.

Summarized Financial Data: The estimated cost of the remaining work: Stage IIC, Design Cost = $70,000; Construction Cost = $650,000

The Stage I and IIA construction contracts, which included repairs to approximately 2.050 feet of levee along the Des Moines River adjacent to the treatment plant, were completed from 1999 through 2002. The Stage IIB contract, which included approximately 700 feet of levee along the Des Moines River upstream of the power generating plant, was partially completed in 2002. Stage IIC will finish the work along the Des Moines River and Four Mile Creek.

Status: Completed and closed out.

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Saylorville Reservoir Cultural Resource Mitigation Plan
Rock Island District
Congressional District: IA- 3

Authority: Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended (16 USC 470-470t, 110).

Location: The project area is located north of the City of Des Moines and south of the Saylorville Dam on the east bank of the Des Moines River on Corps of Engineer fee title lands within the downstream corridor at Saylorville Reservoir in Polk County, Iowa.

Background: The Rock Island District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) is proposing changes in the Regulation Plan of 1983 (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers 1983) for Saylorville Reservoir. The proposed changes would include increasing the maximum growing season release from 12,000 to 16,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) during periods when Lake Red Rock’s pool level is below elevation 758.0 National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 (NGVD), a fall pool raise of 1 to 4 feet, and uncontrolled releases during emergency flood conditions.

The Corps found the Adverse Effect on the Christenson Oneota Site (13PK407) of the proposed changes in the regulation plan could be mitigated under the regulations at 36 CFR 800 implementing Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) by execution of a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for archaeological data recovery. The MOA was signed by the Corps’ District Engineer on April 6, 2001, and began routing on April 17, 2001, for signature by the Iowa State Historic Preservation Office and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (the lessee of this parcel of Corps land).

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
1983 Master Reservoir Regulation Manual, Appendix B, Saylorville Lake, Revised 30 September 1983. Rock Island District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island, Illinois.

Statement of Issue: None

Current Status: Completed. Estimated Total Cost = $227,000

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Bertom and McCartney Lakes Habitat Rehabilitation and Enhancement Project, Pool 16
Rock Island District

Resource Problem: This backwater complex was once a highly productive fishery that also provided valuable waterfowl and wildlife habitat. Sedimentation was rapidly decreasing the extent and diversity of aquatic habitat in this area. Critically low winter dissolved oxygen levels resulted in fish kills. Wind and wave action caused sediment resuspension and turbidity, which in turn reduced light penetration and impacted aquatic vegetation productivity. Fish attracted to stable temperatures associated with anoxic spring-fed flows in the project area were trapped and killed as a combined result of shoaling, ice cover, and lack of inflow, circulation, and escape opportunities.

Project Features:
- Construct a barrier island from dredged material in McCartney Lake;
- Dredge approximately 374,000 cubic yards of material from the side channels and sloughs adjacent to McCartney Lake;
- Line approximately 1,500 feet of a side channel with rock of several different sizes, gradations, and types;
- Install protective fish cover structures within the rock-lined side channel; and,
- Construct an underwater rock partial closing structure at the rock-lined side channel opening.

Project Outputs: The underwater rock partial closing structure reduces the movement of Mississippi bedload sediment into Bertom Lake. Aquatic habitat was increased and diversified by dredging the sloughs and side channels adjacent to McCartney Lake. Providing deep water and access channels to and from the spring-fed flows will reduce winter fish kills. The placement of rock substrate will create valuable fish and mussel habitat. The barrier island provides wind-fetch protection for approximately 10 surface acres of the lake. As an unexpected positive attribute, the barrier island has developed into a perched wetland that provides valuable wildlife habitat.

Financial Data: General design costs were $354,827, and construction costs were $1,989,089. Annual costs for operation, maintenance, and repair are estimated at $5,500 and are the responsibility of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is the non-Federal project sponsor.

Status: Project construction was completed in June 1992. An initial performance evaluation report was distributed in May 1995. A second performance evaluation report was completed in July 2002, and a third was under development for completion scheduled in March 2003. Performance monitoring is continuing.

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