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Iowa River, Chelsea, Study Terminated, Section 205 
Rock Island District

A detailed project report recommending flood protection at the city of Chelsea, located on the Iowa River in Tama County, was approved in 1977. The community is located in the floodplain of the Iowa River. Later study has indicated, however, that the federal project is no longer economically justified, due to the relocation of the town to a higher area, and the project was terminated. 

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Palo Alto County, Study Terminated, Section 205
Rock Island District

A Section 205 Initial Appraisal was completed in May 1985. The study was made to reduce flood damages along the West Fork Des Moines River for approximately 30 miles. A cost estimate for channel improvement is approximately $7.5 million. The study has been terminated due to local sponsor financial capability and willingness to participate. 

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Cedar River, Plainfield, Study Terminated, Section 205
Rock Island District

The Section 205 Feasibility Study was completed in July 1987. The proposed solution, consisting of improved drainage channels, is economically and environmentally acceptable and feasible with a total estimated project cost of $559,000. The project study has been terminated due to local sponsor financial capability and willingness to participate. 

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No-Name Creek, Waterloo, Study Terminated, Section 205
Rock Island District

A Reconnaissance Phase Study was initiated in January 1989 to investigate flood damage reduction alternatives for a primarily commercial and light industrial stream basin near the Waterloo Airport. An initial appraisal determined that potential damages based on existing development would not economically justify a structural project. The study has been terminated. 

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Ralston Creek, Iowa City, Study Terminated, Section 205
Rock Island District

A reconnaissance investigation was made under the authority of Section 205 of the 1948 Flood Control Act, as amended, to consider the feasibility of providing flood protection along Ralston Creek in Iowa City. The study considered the feasibility of a diversion channel in conjunction with a U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Soil Conservation Service watershed program for the Upper Ralston Creek watershed. Based on 1973 price levels, the estimated cost of the joint plan is $3 million. However, work has been terminated since the city has proceeded with studies utilizing other federal funds. 

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Des Moines River, Bank Erosion, Iowa and Missouri, Study Terminated, Local Protection
Rock Island District

This study was authorized in 1974, by resolution of the Committee on Public Works of the Senate, for the purpose of studying streambank erosion on the lower Des Moines River downstream from the Red Rock Dam. Local governments and private landowners have attributed the erosion damage to long-duration releases of bankfull flow from Red Rock Dam following a period of high inflow to the reservoir. The investigation was started in 1976 and completed in 1979 concluding that a bank erosion protection project is not in the federal interest. 

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Des Moines River, Des Moines, Study Terminated, Section 205
Rock Island District

A Reconnaissance Study was completed in December 1988 evaluating an existing flood protection project along the Des Moines River from Saylor Road, along Birdland Drive, and into McHenry Park. The study was terminated due to lack of economic justification.

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Fox River, Iowa and Missouri, Study Terminated, Local Protection
Rock Island District

An early study addressed flood control and related purposes in the Fox River Basin, but determined that economic justification for improvements in the basin was lacking except in the Mississippi-Fox River Drainage District No. 2. At that time, there was no local entity to support a project and the report recommendation was negative. The study authority was held open, however, for later consideration. In 1968, the Mississippi-Fox River Drainage District was organized under the statutes of the Senate of Missouri. In July 1975, the limits of the Mississippi-Fox River drainage district 
were expanded. A resolution adopted in 1976 by the Committee on Public Works and Transportation of the House of Representatives requested a study of flood control and allied purposes in the drainage district. This new study was combined with the outstanding study on the Fox River, and the study was resumed with the appropriation of study funds in fiscal year 1978. Further study indicated that flood control projects were not economically justified at this time and a recommendation was made that the study in the Fox River Basin be terminated.

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Fox River Erosion, Missouri & Iowa
Rock Island District

Location: The Fox River traverses easterly across the southeastern tier of Iowa counties beginning in Appanoose, through Davis and entering the State of Missouri from Van Buren County, Iowa.

Authority: Section 14 of the Flood Control Act and Section 206 of the Water Resources Development Act, (Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration)..

Congressional District: IA-02, MO-09

Current Status: Terminated.

Background: A large headcut estimated to be between 7 and 8 feet high has developed in the Fox River channel in Clark County, MO about a mile downstream of the IA/MO border below Van Buren County, IA. Moving upstream about 750 feet per year, the headcut has eroded and released a large volume of sediment that is degrading habitat downstream and threatens thousands of acres of riparian habitat and newly restored wetlands on public and private land. In addition, if left unchecked the headcut will move upstream and threaten the county highway bridge near Mt. Sterling, Iowa. The bridge and aquatic habitat can be protected, enhanced, and partially restored by the construction of grade control structures, riffle and pool areas, and riparian zone creation along stream corridor areas. These controls will improve water quality by stopping the headcut from eroding more of the stream bed and stabilizing the streambanks thus reducing sediment loads the Fox River. Termination of project due to withdrawal of sponsor support. Sponsor will pursue other Federal programs with more advantageous cost-share ratio.

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Sabula, Study Terminated
Rock Island District

As a result of a July 1989 request from the Sabula Waterfront Commission, the Rock Island District initiated a Section 205 flood damage reduction study in August 1989. The study investigated various structural and non-structural alternatives. The March 1990 Initial Appraisal found none of these plans to be economically feasible. The study was terminated in February 1990. 

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Joyce Slough Restoration
Rock Island District

AUTHORITY: Flood Control Act of 1968

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: IA-01

LOCATION: Joyce Slough is located at RM 518.8 to 519.8, Pool 14 of the Mississippi River and covers approximately 1 mile of former side channel habitat. The slough is located in Clinton County, Iowa. Clinton, Iowa is located between RM’s 513 and 522.

BACKGROUND: Joyce Slough was formerly a side channel to the Mississippi River. The current flood control system was completed in 1981. With the construction of the flood control system, Joyce Slough became a ponding area for interior drainage. The sand levee crosses the slough near 25th Avenue North and proceeds downstream through the center of the island, crossing over to the mainland at 9th Avenue North. The inlet structure is composed of a 10-foot square twin box culvert with a curved configuration to align with the Joyce Slough flow pattern. A large gatewell on the riverside of the conduits provide closure during flood conditions. A bulkhead closure structure flanked by sheetpile cells abut the sand levee. The closure structure is reinforced concrete with two abutments spaced 15-feet apart. The 15 foot opening is more than adequate for hydraulic conditions and accommodates the boats from the 3 marinas within the slough (2 small marinas are upstream of the closure structure, one larger, city-managed marina is downstream of the closure structure). Three 50,000 gallons per minute pumps are located in the abutments and serve as the pumping station for the Joyce Slough ponding area. Carbarn Creek, which drains approximately 1,400 acres and is 50% agricultural and 50% urban, was diverted during the flood protection project construction and now flows into the ponding area at 19th Avenue North. Additionally, Clinton has a combined sewer system with three laterals discharging into Joyce Slough. During high flows, storm water carried into the slough may contain sanitary sewage.

CURRENT STATUS: Terminated

CURRENT WORK: As discussed in the project’s General Design Memo dated November 1972, predicted water quality problems have arisen in Joyce Slough due to decreased flow, increased sedimentation, and chemical inputs from Carbarn Creek and the combined sewer system. Lack of adequate water depths impact recreational navigation. On 12 April 2001, District staff met with Clinton officials to discuss the potential of an ecosystem restoration project under Section 1135 authority. On 3 May 2001, a delegation from Clinton met with HQ staff to discuss options. Project eligibility and habitat justification are not justified under this authority. The costs associated with dredging and/or alteration to the flood control structures would most likely outweigh the ecological benefits that would result from such action. In late 2001, the City has requested permission for a permanent change of the operation of the upstream water control structure by closing the twin box culverts. They believe this change will extend the life of the dredging that they performed in Joyce Slough in the summer of 2001.

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Nahant Marsh Restoration
Rock Island District

AUTHORITY: Section 1135, Project Modifications for the Improvement of the Environment.

CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: IA-01

LOCATION: Nahant Marsh is located at RM 478.0, Pool 16 of the Mississippi River and covers approximately 177 acres. The marsh is located in Scott County, Iowa. Davenport, Iowa is located between RM’s 478 and 485.

BACKGROUND: Nahant Marsh has been effected over a long period of time by urbanization, river channelization, highway construction, and other impacts. Several agencies and community groups are interested in restoring the marsh’s wetland and wildlife habitat to its original value and diversity. The City of Davenport, River Action, Inc., the US Environmental Protection Agency, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Augustana College, Scott County Conservation Board, Quad City Conservation Alliance, Quad Cities Audubon Society, The Sierra Club, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, Izaak Walton League, Iowa DNR, Mississippi River Basin Alliance and many other groups have joined together to produce a master plan for the site. The USEPA and the USFWS worked together to remove hazardous and toxic wastes from the area that resulted from the activities of a former adjacent gun club. Currently, River Action, a non-profit organization, is proceeding with the implementation of improvements laid out in the master plan based on available funding. We have received a Letter of Request from the City of Davenport to initiate a Section 1135 study. A Section 1135 Preliminary Restoration Plan was initiated in February 2001. The Corps worked with the City and other interested parties to develop restoration objectives. Many features were considered, such as reestablishing submergent and emergent vegetation, improving water quality, and installing water control structures for water level management. The sponsor had already obtained material to reseed the shoreline and funding to install a water control structure without Corps assistance. Several obstacles prohibited the Corps from participating in these features with the City at this time. The project site lacks ownership of key parcels and defined management objectives. Until these obstacles are cleared, the Corps cannot design an effective restoration project. Given these constraints, there is no Federal interest to implement a Section 1135 project at Nahant Marsh at this time. However, when a management plan is completed and acquisition of the key parcels is probable, the Corps could re-initiate the Section 1135 process.

CURRENT STATUS: Terminated.

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